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Clarkesworld Issue 91

Clarkesworld Issue 91

Just found out my story “The Meeker and the All-Seeing Eye” has been accepted to Clarkesworld Magazine, and will be appearing there in May. This will be my second story in that publication, the last being “The History Within Us.” That story was reprinted twice, once in The People of the Book, and in Clarkesworld Year 4. It will also soon be appearing in the Czech magazine XB-1.

There are many similarities between the two stories, which is why I decided to send “The Meeker and the All-Seeing Eye” to Clarkesworld: a decimated post-human galaxy, an array of aliens, a cosmic scope. But in many ways this latest story is quite different. It will be interesting to see how people respond.

Needless to say, I’m excited as hell to appear there again.

 

Originally published at Matthew Kressel. You can comment here or there.

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Recently in the wild I spotted this nice review of my Nebula-nominated story “The Sounds of Old Earth” from Adventures in Reading. They say:

“While the story details the last days of this old man on “Old Earth” and his interactions with his family and some of those who have not yet moved on, what the story really seems to be about is of understanding where we came from and of holding a sense of place in your heart.  That we, as humans, came from somewhere and that somewhere is important and belonging to a place is important.  It is sad and wistful, seen through the eyes of a sentimental old man who doesn’t want to leave his home and homeworld, even though it is taking all of his technological skill to keep the poisoned world from intruding onto this one small place of habitation.  It is beautiful, from that perspective, and sad.

And, it is wonderful… I think you should read it.”

It’s nice to know that the story has been received so well. You can read the full review here, but please note it does contain a few spoilers.

 

 

Originally published at Matthew Kressel. You can comment here or there.

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Ellen Kushner & David D. Levine

Ellen Kushner & David D. Levine

The house and our cups overflowed this past Wednesday, as we were delighted by readers Ellen Kushner and David D. Levine. David read part of his story “The Wreck of the Mars Adventure” from the Old Mars anthology, edited by George R.R. Martin and Gardner Dozois, about a mission to Mars using sailing vessels and balloons for lift. Ellen Kushner read an excerpt from her novel-in-progress, a new edition to the Swordspoint series. Fellow Altered-fluidian Mercurio D. Rivera subbed in for Ellen Datlow, who was away at ICFA. (Contrary to hopes, he did not wear a wig.) Meanwhile, I snapped photos of unsuspecting guests doing my best to imitate Ellen’s photographic style.

My photos of the night can be seen here.

Source Article from http://www.kgbfantasticfiction.org/2014/03/21/photos-from-march-19th-with-ellen-kushner-david-d-levine/

Originally published at Matthew Kressel. You can comment here or there.

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Recently Martin Šust of the Czech magazine XB-1 contacted me about translating two of my stories. They will be publishing translated versions of “The History Within Us” and “The Sounds of Old Earth,” the latter of which is up for a Nebula Award. I was very flattered that Martin asked to translate these stories. I became familiar with the Czech magazine after my friend Mercurio D. Rivera had several of his stories appear there. Their covers are always superb, and the magazine itself is beautiful. I’m not sure when the stories will appear yet, but I’m looking forward to seeing them, as they will be my first translated works.

 

XB-1 Cover March 2014

XB-1 Cover March 2014

Originally published at Matthew Kressel. You can comment here or there.

Lunacon this Weekend

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Lunacon

Cats in space reading ebooks.

This weekend I’ll be at Lunacon in Rye Brook, NY. I’ll be on two panels, and supposedly reading with Mercurio D. Rivera in the “library pit” at 8pm Saturday night. I have no idea if this means that if the audience doesn’t like our stories, they will throw us into the “pit”.

My schedule:

Sat, 1pm – “The Future of Privacy”, Westchester Ballroom
Our concepts of privacy are changing daily and mostly due to technology. What will the future hold?

Sat 8pm – Reading with Mercurio D. Rivera, “The Library Pit”[?]

Sun, 1pm – “Writing Groups and Professional Associations” William Odelle
Writing groups? Professional Associations? Secret Society? SFWA, HWA, MWA, the Garden State Speculative Fiction Writers and ____. All are writing organizations, either local or international. Do they really serve a purpose in our writing lives or are they another distraction from writing? Come here writers discuss their experiences.

Come up and say hi if you’re there!

Originally published at Matthew Kressel. You can comment here or there.

Finding A Place to Write

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As most writers know, finding the perfect place to write is almost as challenging as writing itself. Of course, some will say that there is no perfect place to write. That you must write everywhere and anywhere you can. Perhaps that’s true. But for anyone who has ever tried to write in a crowded coffee shop, with babies screaming, people on cell phones, and the guy in the table beside you who keeps sniffling and smells like he put on too much cologne this morning — well, I’d say that some spots are better than others.

I used to write in my living room / office nook, which for most of the day is about as dark as a cave. But since I use the same computer for my day job stuff as a web designer / programmer, I found it was best to separate the two locations. So I wrote in the kitchen, on the hard wooden chairs. That’s where I finished the final draft of “The Sounds of Old Earth,” which is now up for a Nebula Award. You would think that I’d stay put, since the location appears to have worked in my favor.

But ever on the search for a better place, one day I was hit with one of those lightning bolt realizations. My bedroom is sunny almost all day. I don’t know why it had never occurred to me before. So now, this is where I do most of my writing:

My writing desk

My writing desk in Queens, NY

Yeah, it may not be the most ergonomic setup imaginable. But it suits me. On those cold winter days, when it was 7 degrees outside, I found myself right beside the radiator. That and with the sun, I am usually quite toasty here. I even have a small succulent plant to keep me company. C and I call her Bertha.

I have a secret. This new writing location didn’t come entirely out of the blue. Though it took me several months to come up with the idea, I modeled my setup after this:

My writing desk in Maine

My writing desk in West Bath, Maine

This past summer, C and I spent a week at a cottage in West Bath, Maine that overlooked a tidal estuary. Every six hours the tide went in and out, and the waters receded so much you could (if you had the right shoes) walk across to the other side. I wrote at this desk every morning, a mug of hot tea beside me, while the local wildlife chirped, twittered and cheeped from the bordering forest. If ever there was a writing desk, this was it.

And so I modeled my home desk after this perfect spot. And while the M-train subway cars rattling outside my window aren’t quite as natural as the trickling tides, I do find soothing the regular rumble of the trains. And while my current view is a cement backyard, and a barb-wire fence, and a bus depot and train yard, none of this really matters when the sun is shining and the words are flowing, because I’m deep into a story, somewhere in outer space in the far future, or at a rock concert swarming with time travelers, or walking through old factories in a New England post-industrial town, or somewhere else.

So maybe those people who say you must be able to write anywhere are correct; once your imagination takes over, it doesn’t matter where you are. But I still believe that some spots are more conducive to creativity. And those spots don’t necessarily need to be at a cottage overlooking a tidal estuary. There might be one right beside you.

Originally published at Matthew Kressel. You can comment here or there.

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Nebula Award LogoI’m beyond happy to announce that my story “The Sounds of Old Earth” has been nominated for a Nebula Award in the category of Best Short Story, alongside great works by Sofia Samatar, Ken Schneyer, Rachel Swirsky, and Sylvia Spruck Wrigley. Congrats to all nominees and big thank you to Lightspeed Magazine and John Joseph Adams for publishing it! This is an incredible honor just to be nominated.

“The Sounds of Old Earth” is one of my favorite stories, and in many ways one of my most personal tales, as the plot centers on environmental degradation, a subject that concerns me very much. If you want to, you can read the story here.

I would also like to congratulate fellow Altered-Fluidain Alaya Dawn Johnson, who received not one but two nominations on the ballot. And super huge congratulations to all the nominees. I wish all of you the best of luck!

Best Novel
  • We Are All Completely Beside Ourselves, Karen Joy Fowler (Marian Wood)
  • The Ocean at the End of the Lane, Neil Gaiman (Morrow; Headline Review)
  • Fire with Fire, Charles E. Gannon (Baen)
  • Hild, Nicola Griffith (Farrar, Straus and Giroux)
  • Ancillary Justice, Ann Leckie (Orbit US; Orbit UK)
  • The Red: First Light, Linda Nagata (Mythic Island)
  • A Stranger in Olondria, Sofia Samatar (Small Beer)
  • The Golem and the Jinni, Helene Wecker (Harper)
Best Novella
  • ‘‘Wakulla Springs,’’ Andy Duncan & Ellen Klages (Tor.com 10/2/13)
  • ‘‘The Weight of the Sunrise,’’ Vylar Kaftan (Asimov’s 2/13)
  • ‘‘Annabel Lee,” Nancy Kress (New Under the Sun)
  • ‘‘Burning Girls,’’ Veronica Schanoes (Tor.com 6/19/13)
  • ‘‘Trial of the Century,’’ Lawrence M. Schoen (lawrencemschoen.com, 8/13; World Jumping)
  • Six-Gun Snow White, Catherynne M. Valente (Subterranean)
Best Novelette
  • ‘‘Paranormal Romance,’’ Christopher Barzak (Lightspeed 6/13)
  • ‘‘The Waiting Stars,’’ Aliette de Bodard (The Other Half of the Sky)
  • ‘‘They Shall Salt the Earth with Seeds of Glass,’’ Alaya Dawn Johnson (Asimov’s 1/13)
  • ‘‘Pearl Rehabilitative Colony for Ungrateful Daughters,’’ Henry Lien (Asimov’s 12/13)
  • ‘‘The Litigation Master and the Monkey King,’’ Ken Liu (Lightspeed 8/13)
  • ‘‘In Joy, Knowing the Abyss Behind,’’ Sarah Pinsker (Strange Horizons 7/1 – 7/8/13)
 Best Short Story
  • ‘‘The Sounds of Old Earth,’’ Matthew Kressel (Lightspeed 1/13)
  • ‘‘Selkie Stories Are for Losers,’’ Sofia Samatar (Strange Horizons 1/7/13)
  • ‘‘Selected Program Notes from the Retrospective Exhibition of Theresa Rosenberg Latimer,’’ Kenneth Schneyer (Clockwork Phoenix 4)
  • ‘‘If You Were a Dinosaur, My Love,’’ Rachel Swirsky (Apex 3/13)
  • ‘‘Alive, Alive Oh,’’ Sylvia Spruck Wrigley (Lightspeed 6/13)
Ray Bradbury Award for Outstanding Dramatic Presentation
  • Doctor Who: ‘‘The Day of the Doctor’’ (Nick Hurran, director; Steven Moffat, writer) (BBC Wales)
  • Europa Report (Sebastián Cordero, director; Philip Gelatt, writer) (Start Motion Pictures)
  • Gravity (Alfonso Cuarón, director; Alfonso Cuarón & Jonás Cuarón, writers) (Warner Bros.)
  • Her (Spike Jonze, director; Spike Jonze, writer) (Warner Bros.)
  • The Hunger Games: Catching Fire (Francis Lawrence, director; Simon Beaufoy & Michael deBruyn, writers) (Lionsgate)
  • Pacific Rim (Guillermo del Toro, director; Travis Beacham & Guillermo del Toro, writers) (Warner Bros.)
Andre Norton Award for Young Adult Science Fiction and Fantasy
  • The Coldest Girl in Coldtown, Holly Black (Little, Brown; Indigo)
  • When We Wake, Karen Healey (Allen & Unwin; Little, Brown)
  • Sister Mine, Nalo Hopkinson (Grand Central)
  • The Summer Prince, Alaya Dawn Johnson (Levine)
  • Hero, Alethea Kontis (Harcourt)
  • September Girls, Bennett Madison (Harper Teen)
  • A Corner of White, Jaclyn Moriarty (Levine)

Originally published at Matthew Kressel. You can comment here or there.

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Nebula Award LogoI’m beyond happy to announce that my story “The Sounds of Old Earth” has been nominated for a Nebula Award in the category of Best Short Story, alongside great works by Sofia Samatar, Ken Schneyer, Rachel Swirsky, and Sylvia Spruck Wrigley. Congrats to all nominees and big thank you to Lightspeed Magazine and John Joseph Adams for publishing it! This is an incredible honor just to be nominated.

“The Sounds of Old Earth” is one of my favorite stories, and in many ways one of my most personal tales, as the plot centers on environmental degradation, a subject that concerns me very much. If you want to, you can read the story here.

I would also like to congratulate fellow Altered-Fluidain Alaya Dawn Johnson, who received not one but two nominations on the ballot. And super huge congratulations to all the nominees. I wish all of you the best of luck!

Best Novel
  • We Are All Completely Beside Ourselves, Karen Joy Fowler (Marian Wood)
  • The Ocean at the End of the Lane, Neil Gaiman (Morrow; Headline Review)
  • Fire with Fire, Charles E. Gannon (Baen)
  • Hild, Nicola Griffith (Farrar, Straus and Giroux)
  • Ancillary Justice, Ann Leckie (Orbit US; Orbit UK)
  • The Red: First Light, Linda Nagata (Mythic Island)
  • A Stranger in Olondria, Sofia Samatar (Small Beer)
  • The Golem and the Jinni, Helene Wecker (Harper)
Best Novella
  • ‘‘Wakulla Springs,’’ Andy Duncan & Ellen Klages (Tor.com 10/2/13)
  • ‘‘The Weight of the Sunrise,’’ Vylar Kaftan (Asimov’s 2/13)
  • ‘‘Annabel Lee,” Nancy Kress (New Under the Sun)
  • ‘‘Burning Girls,’’ Veronica Schanoes (Tor.com 6/19/13)
  • ‘‘Trial of the Century,’’ Lawrence M. Schoen (lawrencemschoen.com, 8/13; World Jumping)
  • Six-Gun Snow White, Catherynne M. Valente (Subterranean)
Best Novelette
  • ‘‘Paranormal Romance,’’ Christopher Barzak (Lightspeed 6/13)
  • ‘‘The Waiting Stars,’’ Aliette de Bodard (The Other Half of the Sky)
  • ‘‘They Shall Salt the Earth with Seeds of Glass,’’ Alaya Dawn Johnson (Asimov’s 1/13)
  • ‘‘Pearl Rehabilitative Colony for Ungrateful Daughters,’’ Henry Lien (Asimov’s 12/13)
  • ‘‘The Litigation Master and the Monkey King,’’ Ken Liu (Lightspeed 8/13)
  • ‘‘In Joy, Knowing the Abyss Behind,’’ Sarah Pinsker (Strange Horizons 7/1 – 7/8/13)
 Best Short Story
  • ‘‘The Sounds of Old Earth,’’ Matthew Kressel (Lightspeed 1/13)
  • ‘‘Selkie Stories Are for Losers,’’ Sofia Samatar (Strange Horizons 1/7/13)
  • ‘‘Selected Program Notes from the Retrospective Exhibition of Theresa Rosenberg Latimer,’’ Kenneth Schneyer (Clockwork Phoenix 4)
  • ‘‘If You Were a Dinosaur, My Love,’’ Rachel Swirsky (Apex 3/13)
  • ‘‘Alive, Alive Oh,’’ Sylvia Spruck Wrigley (Lightspeed 6/13)
Ray Bradbury Award for Outstanding Dramatic Presentation
  • Doctor Who: ‘‘The Day of the Doctor’’ (Nick Hurran, director; Steven Moffat, writer) (BBC Wales)
  • Europa Report (Sebastián Cordero, director; Philip Gelatt, writer) (Start Motion Pictures)
  • Gravity (Alfonso Cuarón, director; Alfonso Cuarón & Jonás Cuarón, writers) (Warner Bros.)
  • Her (Spike Jonze, director; Spike Jonze, writer) (Warner Bros.)
  • The Hunger Games: Catching Fire (Francis Lawrence, director; Simon Beaufoy & Michael deBruyn, writers) (Lionsgate)
  • Pacific Rim (Guillermo del Toro, director; Travis Beacham & Guillermo del Toro, writers) (Warner Bros.)
Andre Norton Award for Young Adult Science Fiction and Fantasy
  • The Coldest Girl in Coldtown, Holly Black (Little, Brown; Indigo)
  • When We Wake, Karen Healey (Allen & Unwin; Little, Brown)
  • Sister Mine, Nalo Hopkinson (Grand Central)
  • The Summer Prince, Alaya Dawn Johnson (Levine)
  • Hero, Alethea Kontis (Harcourt)
  • September Girls, Bennett Madison (Harper Teen)
  • A Corner of White, Jaclyn Moriarty (Levine)

Originally published at Matthew Kressel. You can comment here or there.

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Felix Gilman & Kiini Ibura Salaam

Felix Gilman & Kiini Ibura Salaam

Felix Gilman opened the night with a description of the Hermetic Order of the Golden Dawn, a Victorian occult society who used various esoteric practices to mind travel to other planets. And thus a door into strange worlds was opened as he read from his soon-to-be-released novel Revolutions about a group of very odd mathematicians and madness. And travel became the theme of the night as Kiini Ibura Salaam read “Battle Royale” from her Tiptree award-winning collection Ancient, Ancient, where time travel becomes a form of punishment.

To time travel back to Wednesday, you may visit Ellen’s photos of the night here.

Source Article from http://www.kgbfantasticfiction.org/2014/02/23/photos-from-feb-19th-with-felix-gilman-kiini-ibura-salaam/

Originally published at Matthew Kressel. You can comment here or there.